mediamattersforamerica:

CBS host James Brown’s brilliant commentary on domestic abuse comes on the heels of the 20th anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act:

…this problem is bigger than football. There has been, appropriately so, intense and widespread outrage following the release of the video showing what happened inside the elevator at the casino. But wouldn’t it be productive if this collective outrage, as my colleagues have said, could be channelled to truly hear and address the long-suffering cries for help by so many women? And as they said, do something about it? Like an on-going education of men about what healthy, respectful manhood is all about.

And it starts with how we view women. Our language is important. For instance, when a guy says, ‘you throw the ball like a girl’ or ‘you’re a little sissy,’ it reflects an attitude that devalues women and attitudes will eventually manifest in some fashion. Women have been at the forefront in the domestic violence awareness and prevention arena. And whether Janay Rice considers herself a victim or not, millions of women in this country are.

Consider this: According to domestic violence experts, more than three women per day lose their lives at the hands of their partners. That means that since the night February 15th in Atlantic City [when the elevator incident occurred] more than 600 women have died.

Related: 8 facts about violence against women everyone should know (via Vox)

cross-connect:

Artist Samantha Keely Smith paints breathtaking abstract landscapes that resemble the swirling waters of the ocean. Using oil paint, enamel, and shellac, Smith builds up multiple translucent layers of color, alternating between soft brushstrokes and large, sweeping gestures to evoke crashing waves, surging tides, and stormy floods.

Via 

// Selected by Sunil

(via catedrals)

tvhangover:

How Anna Gunn’s Performance as Skyler White Changed Television.

Gunn’s performance was not that of an action heroine or a television genius, and it was not meant to be. Skyler carries the weight of Walt’s actions. Plenty of people hated her for it, Walt sometimes included. But Gunn’s performance pushed both Walt and the people who wanted to see him as a hero to increasingly contrived and ludicrous justifications for treating Skyler like she was a worse person than Walt.
Gunn’s drawn face in the last two seasons of “Breaking Bad” might not have brought about the end of the anti-hero era in television. But Gunn’s performance marked the end of a time when the creators of such shows could get away with writing anti-heroes’ wives as flat, cartoonish characters, or when audiences could get away with worshiping difficult men without encountering strong opposition.

tvhangover:

How Anna Gunn’s Performance as Skyler White Changed Television.

Gunn’s performance was not that of an action heroine or a television genius, and it was not meant to be. Skyler carries the weight of Walt’s actions. Plenty of people hated her for it, Walt sometimes included. But Gunn’s performance pushed both Walt and the people who wanted to see him as a hero to increasingly contrived and ludicrous justifications for treating Skyler like she was a worse person than Walt.

Gunn’s drawn face in the last two seasons of “Breaking Bad” might not have brought about the end of the anti-hero era in television. But Gunn’s performance marked the end of a time when the creators of such shows could get away with writing anti-heroes’ wives as flat, cartoonish characters, or when audiences could get away with worshiping difficult men without encountering strong opposition.

iwatchforsasha:

Over the weekend you may have heard of or seen - nude photos of celebrities were stolen off of their phones and posted online. It’s a terrible invasion of privacy, but probably the most disconcerting part of this for me is that some people are blaming the celebrities for having the nude photos on their phones in the first place.

(via wakeofourdreams)

nprfreshair:

Today’s interview is with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for the New York Times.  Arango has been reporting from Iraq for nearly five years, and has served as bureau chief since 2011, the year the U.S. completed its troop withdrawal from Iraq.  He’s watched the rise of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, and the he’s covered the Iraqi government, which under the leadership of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, was seen as corrupt and sectarian, persecuting Sunnis. 

TERRY GROSS: Do you think that ISIS would’ve existited if not for the American invasion of Iraq?
TIM ARANGO: No, absolutely not. 
GROSS: How did the American invasion help create ISIS?
ARANGO: The Americans come to invade Iraq and I think it’s partly because the Sunnis are going to be out of power. The Americans come in and topple Saddam Hussein, who was Sunni, and there’s been a Sunni elite governing Iraq for centuries and they come in, the Sunnis realize they’re going to be left out of this, they’re not going to be running the country anymore, so resistance movements sprung up. The other thing the Americans did was disbanding the Iraqi army which created a whole group of would-be potential insurgents. So al-Qaida in Iraq is formed and many of the things that the Maliki government has done to alienate Sunnis they learned from the Americans. The Americans taught them how to exclude Sunnis from political life with de-Baathification and things like that. The other thing Maliki has done is these mass arrests of Sunni men and of suspected terrorists and that’s exactly what the Americans did. So as the Americans tried to fight these guys they would do these mass arrests and they could put them in places like [U.S. detention facility] Camp Bucca, most of the leaders of ISIS were in Camp Bucca and they got know each other, they got to plan, they got to hang out, and so every turn in the Iraq story now is the American legacy and the epic American failure in Iraq.

Photo:  Kurdish pesh merga fighters on Tuesday battled ISIS at a point east of Mosul secured with the help of United States airstrikes. Credit:  Jm Lopez/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

nprfreshair:

Today’s interview is with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for the New York Times.  Arango has been reporting from Iraq for nearly five years, and has served as bureau chief since 2011, the year the U.S. completed its troop withdrawal from Iraq.  He’s watched the rise of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, and the he’s covered the Iraqi government, which under the leadership of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, was seen as corrupt and sectarian, persecuting Sunnis. 

TERRY GROSS: Do you think that ISIS would’ve existited if not for the American invasion of Iraq?

TIM ARANGO: No, absolutely not. 

GROSS: How did the American invasion help create ISIS?

ARANGO: The Americans come to invade Iraq and I think it’s partly because the Sunnis are going to be out of power. The Americans come in and topple Saddam Hussein, who was Sunni, and there’s been a Sunni elite governing Iraq for centuries and they come in, the Sunnis realize they’re going to be left out of this, they’re not going to be running the country anymore, so resistance movements sprung up. The other thing the Americans did was disbanding the Iraqi army which created a whole group of would-be potential insurgents. So al-Qaida in Iraq is formed and many of the things that the Maliki government has done to alienate Sunnis they learned from the Americans. The Americans taught them how to exclude Sunnis from political life with de-Baathification and things like that. The other thing Maliki has done is these mass arrests of Sunni men and of suspected terrorists and that’s exactly what the Americans did. So as the Americans tried to fight these guys they would do these mass arrests and they could put them in places like [U.S. detention facility] Camp Bucca, most of the leaders of ISIS were in Camp Bucca and they got know each other, they got to plan, they got to hang out, and so every turn in the Iraq story now is the American legacy and the epic American failure in Iraq.

Photo:  Kurdish pesh merga fighters on Tuesday battled ISIS at a point east of Mosul secured with the help of United States airstrikes. 
Credit:  Jm Lopez/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images